Rebecca Taylor MEP and Chris Davies MEP: Medicinal regulation avoided but fight for ecigs not over yet

There are better ways to regulate

Liberal Democrat MEP and Health Spokeswoman in the European Parliament Rebecca Taylor welcomed the fact that mandatory medicinal regulation of electronic cigarettes was rejected in negotiations on the EU Tobacco Products Directive, but expressed her disappointment over some aspects of the outcome.

In negotiations last night (Monday), proposals from the European Commission that all electronic cigarettes should be controlled by pharmaceutical legislation were rejected by MEPs. Governments will now have to propose special legal justifications if they wish electronic cigarettes to be treated differently from conventional tobacco cigarettes.

In negotiations with representatives of EU governments, MEPs agreed on a compromise that the maximum nicotine content of e-cigs available for general sale should be 20mg/ml, a major increase on the 4mg/ml originally proposed by the Commission and above the average routinely used. The nicotine level agreed is regarded as closely comparable to that derived from smoking conventional cigarettes.

It was agreed that the flavourings that can be used in e-cigs will be specified by national governments rather than specified by EU legislation.  Refillable units, which are widely used at present, will continue to be available. They will however be subject to a safeguard clause meaning that Member States can introduce stringent national measures including a prohibition against concerned products – if justified by evidence of a serious risk to public health. If refillable e-cigarettes have been prohibited in at least three Member States, the Commission would be able to extend the ban to all Member States through a delegated act but that could be blocked by a majority in the European Parliament. The Commission was also asked to report on health and safety risks of refillables within two years’ time.

Rebecca Taylor commented:

 “Significant ground had been won in the rejection of Europe wide medicines licensing. But the decision to potentially ban refillable cartridges and devices in future would be a backward step.”

 “Second and third generation e-cigarette devices, which are used by around 80% of long term e-cigarette consumers, allow users to mix and match their desired flavours and nicotine strengths. They are a key part of what attracts someone to quit smoking tobacco and switch to e-cigarettes and to stick to vaping rather than go back to smoking.”

 “Unless manufacturers are able to adapt their products to accommodate disposable cartridges, I worry that a substantial number of e-cigarette users may be pushed back to tobacco, which is the exact opposite of what the tobacco directive is supposed to achieve.”

 “The fight is now on to show that it would not be justifiable to ban refillable cartridges on health and safety grounds.”

Chris Davies MEP added:

“We have seen a massive turnaround in the approach towards e-cigs and that is very much to be welcomed. These things can save lives because smokers find them pleasurable to use.”

“But we are determined to fight to the end on behalf of e-cig users.  Their health benefits are enormous compared to smoking tobacco and they can be a game-changer in the fight against smoking-related disease.  They should never have been included within legislation intended to regulate tobacco products.”

“So long as conventional cigarettes are available everywhere the restrictions on e-cigs should be minimal.  Too many EU governments simply don’t get it. The controls they favour will lead to people dying unnecessarily who might otherwise have switched from smoking cigarettes to using a product not now associated with any deaths at all.”

 

 

20 thoughts on “Rebecca Taylor MEP and Chris Davies MEP: Medicinal regulation avoided but fight for ecigs not over yet

  1. There’s no point adapting the devices to disposable cartridges. We’re all tried those. They don’t work. The European Parliament needs to reject this unscientific travesty.

  2. Many thanks for all your hard work – I will not go to tobacco (and death) I will find underground supplies or ways to import as will millions of other e-cig users!

    I have no doubt, they have just created a huge blackmarket that will end up killing due to unscrupulous importers – Ironically it will still be safer than smoking.

  3. Thank you both for your continued and tireless support. It is clear that the motive for banning e-cigarettes is not one of public health.

    Please keep going, they cannot be allowed to get away with this.

  4. This makes me so sad. I’m proud I finally managed to stop smoking. I don’t want to smoke tobacco again. This is a death sentence. How can they justify tobacco being totally legal and ecigs that people use instead of smoking banned! How can they live with themselves.

  5. Thankyou! Please don’t give up to fight for the e-cigarettes! Please don’t ban refillable cartigdes!!! Single use cartigdes don’t works!!! Nobody will use them!
    Please don’t give up!!!

  6. Keeo up the good work Rebecca and Chris. We thank you and are behind you all the way. The (monetary?) pressure from Big Pharma and Big Tobacco on the M.E.P’s must be absolutely enormous. Either that or they are trying to legislate something they haven’t a clue about. Let’s get ecigs postponed and DEMAND the inclusion of the industry and users in any further negotiations on legislation.

  7. I do not fear actual e-cig smokers will go back to tobacco; they will go underground and will be forced to dangerous practices with pure nicotine in their back kitchen with no control whatsoever on the black market. Or did you think such an aberration of law would be obeyed. But millions of smokers will be denied a way out tobacco indeed. This day will go into history as the day the EU launched a premeditated genocide on its citizens to salvage the tax income on tobacco. I do seriously question the right of existence of such an EU.

  8. Who are the winners if e-cig is banned? I think the biggest winner will be the states. In Germany about 60% of the cigarette price are taxes. If I calculate with 2 Mio. vapers that have stopped smoking, 1 pack per day…it’s about 6 Mio. Euros loss in tax per DAY. So there is no interest from the countrys to get the e-cigs stronger. And the speeches where they tell smokers to stop…they hope that it don’t work.

  9. After 40 years smoking watching friends and family members die from cancer and other smoking related illnesses i descovered vaping by accident .some lads that i worked with had e cigs in the van going to work i thought they were stupid sucking on plastic fags blowing out pretend smoke so i took the piss out of them saing plastic fags for fags why dont you put a dildo cover on them and be a proper fag this went on for weeks till one of the lads said try one or shut up and leave us alone so i got one thinking waste of money . At the time i was smoking forty plus a day i had tried all sorts of “anti smoking” ideas patched gum tabs tobaco tea bags waste of time the deal was try it for a week and go back to fags and take the piss as much as i want so day one twenty quid spent on an e cig gave it a go after the first day i was hooked hand to mouth habbit covered mouth e cig hanging out covered cravings covered or non egsizgant

  10. Since the first day i have smoked six yes six tobaco cigs when my charger packed up i dropped the nikoteen level from 24 mg to now between zero and 6 mg thanks to e cigs .i now habe a collection of vapes of different types and sizes but thats part of the attraction for me i can build my coils to my own taste strong or week more or less flavour high or low nik my choice after smoking for forty years i had given up trying to quit i just vape and feel a lot better in my self thirteen months later i look back i can see that i was wasting at todays prices the best part of five and a half thousand pounds a year .by banning e cigs people like will not have the choice i had but get a lame half baked version wich will not do the job . Ban them dont ban them should be no ones right but the right to the choice should be every bodys thankyou pat hanrahan non smokerbut proud vaper vape on
    s

  11. Refillable’s are a none negotiable item. If they go so do ecigs as we know them and the black market will take over. Even with our tight national borders billions of £ of illegal drugs flood in every year so clearly there will be no way to stop ecigs. Make it legal! No vaper wants a black market but they want it more than a ban. Every vaper I know, and believe me that’s a huge number of people, have already told me they will use the black market if forced to. It’s not too late!!

  12. I agree with Nicholas. I don’t have any intention of complying with a ban on flavours, refillable devices or liquid over 20mg/ml (I use 24mg/ml.) I’ll simply order whatever I need from China. It’s cheap enough that I can run the risk of some parcels not making it through the Stasi border checkpoints – especially when the alternative is €30 per day or so on foul-tasting, weak disposable cartridges.

    I’ll also do everything I can to convert users of “approved” e-cigs to ones that actually work, and tell them how to get their hands on the better equipment and liquid. There are 7 million vapers in Europe just now. When there are 70 million what sort of political threat will we pose?

  13. With some countries treating the electronic cigarette as tobacco, others as a general consumer product, perhaps others still insisting it’s a medicine, there will be a total mess at the EU’s internal borders, compounded by different governments approving different flavours.

    The nicotine limit will lead to a growth in the sale of pure nicotine which will be added at home to commercially available liquids, as well as to an increase in the practice of mixing one’s own liquid. Accidents will ensue.

    It looks like more harm and certainly mayhem will be caused by approving the Tobacco Products Directive, than the benefits sought by the tighter anti-tobacco measures elsewhere in the document.

    Would it not be wise to recommend the rejection of the entire Directive?

  14. Rebbecca and Clive, are you and Frederique intending on recommending this compromise to the liberal voting block?
    or are [you]“ determined to fight to the end on behalf of e-cig users. Their health benefits are enormous compared to smoking tobacco and they can be a game-changer in the fight against smoking-related disease. They should never have been included within legislation intended to regulate tobacco products.”

  15. I’m afraid I don’t agree that “Significant ground” has been made at all, from what I can gather this will just be medicinal regulation through the back door…
    For a start the 20mg nicotine limit is unacceptable, banning refillables (and lets face it we know that’s what the reassessment in 2 years is about), leaving the individual governments to decide whether to go for medicinal regulation is also unacceptable. The whole of the new amendment should be thrown out, as its just giving the rapporteurs exactly what they wanted in the first place! E-cigs are not a tobacco product and should not be in the TPD, they also are not medicines!!
    If E-cigs are not taken out of the TPD it will be the end of them. as there’s too many people with vested interests that have they’re claws into the EU decision makers and they wont let go until they’ve squeezed the life out of E-cigs and literally out of E-cig users!

  16. A limit of 20mg – and this is a success??? Not to me, I vape at 24mg, so I have a choice, black market juice (as I don’t use cartridges) or go back to cigarettes and increase my chances of dying early.

  17. ” If refillable e-cigarettes have been prohibited in at least three Member States, the Commission would be able to extend the ban to all Member States through a delegated act but that could be blocked by a majority in the European Parliament.”

    How can this be blocked if this dont need the approval of the European Parliament or member states?

    “Unless manufacturers are able to adapt their products to accommodate disposable cartridges, I worry that a substantial number of e-cigarette users may be pushed back to tobacco, which is the exact opposite of what the tobacco directive is supposed to achieve.”

    I do not hope you now are willing to sacrifice the vapers to get the tobacco directive through parliament. Ecigs are more important than inconsequential changes as slightly larger warnings on cigarette packs and bans on slim and menthol ect. – things that have no impact – and certainly not compared to ecigs

  18. The article contains a factual error when it reports that 20mg/ml is the level of nicotine that is comparable with smoking cigarettes – it is much lower than cigarettes.

    Blood plasma trials conducted at Manchester University by CN Creative have shown that the nicotine concentration in liquid that is required to match cigarette smoking is 45 mg/ml

    A common mistake is to compare the nicotine in e-liquid with the stated nicotine on the side of a pack of cigs. The figures are not the same. The amount shown on the side of a pack of cigs is the actual dose of nicotine that is delivered into the bloodstream, not the nicotine content of the tobacco.

    The efficiency of delivery from an e-cig is not 100% (more like 33-40%)- therefore the figures cannot be accurately compared.

    A 20mg/ml limit will render e-cigs as useless for many people, especially heavier smokers.

  19. Please do bare in mind that if parliament is incapable to stop the council and commission, the only way the voters can show their disagreement is to vote against the EU since those people elect themselves and are not accountable towards the constituents. We want regulation, not a ban and destruction of all small and medium sized businesses that due to the quality of their products, make up over 80% of the actual market, in favour of a couple big brands, who mainly are controlled by big T.

    Instructing your relatives to buy shares on your behalf, and then forcing a law that puts those companies in a monopoly by destroying all the competition, so the next day your shares skyrocket, is one publicly known way of making a living for unelected and unaccountable politicians. And it is obvious one can’t do so with smaller companies that are not quoted at the stock exchange. Extremely difficult to prove in a court of law, but only to allow certain brands and banning all the other brands, for no valid reason whatsoever smells badly like stock manipulation.

  20. It is not clear whether refillable cartridges will be limited to a maximum volume of 1 or 2 mls. Whichever, this wipes out a whole industry making ever better atomisers. The one I have here is made in Germany but designed in Russia. Presumably the manufacturers won’t have too much problem relocating eastwards. The real problem will be for customs officers trying to stop lots of little packages from entering the EU. The same will be true for the larger (and much cheaper) e-liquid bottles, no longer bought from within the Union but purchased a-plenty from beyond. Beware of unintended consequences!